Planning / Land Use: March 2008 Archives

This is final entry on my Korean cities tour, sponsored by the US Dept. of State and US Embassy in Seoul.

I'm back in the US after five days in Korea, on a hectic, though quite successful visit to cities of Seoul, Changwon and Busan to lecture at universities and meet with Korean officials about the development of green cities.

Koreanatrail.jpg

Seoul Redux

I took a relaxed journey to Seoul on the high-speed Korean National Rail from Busan--I loved the way the conductors ceremoniously bow to the passengers after entering or before leaving each train car, and the Korean folk music that plays before each station announcement. We then went to Seoul National University, where I was to deliver a lecture at the school of Architecture and Urban Design and graduate school of Environmental Studies.

(Seoul National University is the top public educational institute in the nation.)

seoulnatuniv.jpg

First we made a courtesy visit to the Dean of  Architecture and Urban Design, Kiho Kim.  Dr. Kim told us he is preparing this summer to open the Asian Sustainability Institute on the campus, the first such institute for all of Asia. I look forward to collaborating with Dr. Kim and other partners on the institute's positioning and planning.

Seoul National University in conjuncton with the city of Seoul is also hatching a plan to make the university campus a living model of a creative and green neighborhood, celebrating the arts, cultural attractions and the latest in sustainable urban planning, design and technology. Think of a green Dinkytown, the off-campus neighborhood near the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where Dr. Kim previously taught, he told us.


After lunch with Dr. Kim and professors Kyung-Jin Zoh and Jong-Sang Sung, I lectured to about 50 professors and students, including one professor that is working with the Korea Land Corporation on the Korea cities indicators project I mentioned in my second-previous blog entry (see "Halftime Report" blog from March 12).

Our final stop was Seoul City Hall to present to and meet officials from the city's "Green Seoul" program. Seoul's sustainability efforts appear to be more siloed than those of leading US cities, with "green" efforts having separate city management from such areas as city public transportation, fleet management and renewable energy.

On the subject of climate change and carbon action planning, however, I was told by Seoul Green deputy director Yoon Jong Choi that Seoul will be sponsoring the C40 Large Cities summit meeting of the world's most populous 40 cities, sponsored by the William J. Clinton Foundation's Climate Initiative. I attended the first C40 summit in New York City last spring and hope to be back in Seoul for the next C40 event in 2009.

green tea cappaccino

My final night in Seoul was spent checking out the very cool Myeongdong neighborhood with the US Embassy's Eun Kyong. We had green tea lattes and cheesecake, made from local organic tea grown in the southwest of Korea. Turns out Koreans are also very concerned about pesticide and pollution food contamination from Chinese imports, especially heavily pesticide sprayed tea.

Huge thanks to Choi Eun Kyong, assistant cultural affairs officer Jeffrey Beller, Jean Vander Woude, John Dyson and my interpreter Kim Chi Young for all their excellent planning, cultural guidance and hard work in putting the trip, lectures and meetings together. It's extremely heartening to know that the US Embassy has such high-caliber representation overseas!

I'm sure future developments resulting from this tour will be forthcoming. I'll keep you posted.

Photos: Warren (top two); Flicker: LWY



seoul nite.jpg


I am in the midst of a whirlwind green cities tour of Korea, lecturing and meeting with people on green city development and metrics. Tour was set up by State Department and US Embassy as part of a cultural exchange.

Day One:

Seoul 

Radio interview for Cafe USA, which also was filmed for Korean portal "Daum" (listen online). Met with Green Transport NGO leader Min Man-gee, first group to focus on transportation in this city of 10 million. They try to ensure safety for pedrestrians, cyclists and improve planning and use of public transit. Green Transport provides funds for families of victims killed in traffic. Amazing. Reported 64% public transit use in Seoul Metro, which they are trying to get increased to 70%. Seoul is already better in terms of ridership than anything in US (NYC 55%). I hope to blog more about this more in detail for Worldchanging.com

Lunch in Seoul old town area with professors from Chungang University, Konkuk Univesity, Kookmin University, Inceon Development Institute and Eco Plan Research Center. Talk of urban forest preservation and restoration. Korean food is a rich secret: fish, sauces, kim chee, cooked roots and radishes, numerous short-rice courses and broths. No barbecue in sight.

Korean Green Foundation. Turns out the foundation's energetic Executive Director Yul Choi is a former recipent of Goldman Prize in 1995, where my wife worked as program executive for 14 years. She recommended I look him up, but he was already on my schedule thanks to Embassy/State Department schedulers and we met and had dinner together after my presentation. I agreed to be on the advisory board of this, Korea's largest Environmental NGO along with Jane Goodall, Helena Norberg Hodge and Lester Brown. Did interview for national MBN TV to air Wednesday.

Day Two

Gyeonggi Province

This morning I presented to Korean Land Development Corporation, the government agency responsible for nation's planning and land development. I lectured to and was grilled by about 50 staff members in urban planning, "new town" development and clean transportation division. In the end I was invited to collaborate on ranking Korea's cities on green factors by director of that extensive effort, Duck Bok Lee. Lunch of more yummy, mostly unidentified stuff.

Photos by Warren: KLDC banquet, lunch fare
IMG_2225.jpg IMG_2226.jpg

busan bullet.jpgBusan

I write from Korea's second largest city, Busan (they don't call it Pusan anymore), which has about 3.5 million people, a giant port town in Southeast, where I took a bullet train with program people from State Dept./ Embassy. The ocean pounds outside my window. Had dinner and discussion with "Environmentally Friendly Busan" citizen group, including doctors (one from Green Doctors), a news anchor, dentist, YMCA and YWCA presidents, newspaper editor and city council member. We had good discussion about their goal of getting more open space for the city, as Korea is developing on a China-like scale from what I can see on my short tour of duty. The Green Doctors rep invited me to help in work he is doing with North Korea, which he says is environmentally devastated, in addition to floods, famine, etc. 

Time to sleep and do it again tomorrrow: Changwon University, Panel with UN and Japan in Changwon, "The Environmental Hub of Asia," etc.


seoul.jpg

Photo credits: fukagawa, jsteph, tylerdurden

 

About the Author

    Warren Karlenzig
Warren
Warren Karlenzig, Common Current founder and president, has worked with the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (lead co-author United Nations Shanghai Manual: A Guide to Sustainable Urban Development in the 21st Century, 2011); United Nations Center for Regional Development (training of mayors from 13 Asian nations on city sustainable economic development and technology); provinces of Guizhou and Guangdong, China (urban sustainability master planning and green city standards); the United States White House and Environmental Protection Agency (Eco-Industrial Park planning and Industrial Ecology primer); the nation of South Korea ("New Cities Green Metrics"); The European Union ("Green and Connected Cities Initiative"); the State of California ("Comprehensive Recycling Communities" and "Sustainable Community Plans"); major cities; and the world's largest corporations developing policy, strategy, financing and critical operational capacities for 20 years.

Present and recent clients include the Guangzhou Planning Agency; the Global Forum on Human Settlements; the Shanghai 2010 World Expo Bureau; the US Department of State; the Asian Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability; the David and Lucile Packard Foundation; the non-governmental organization Ecocity Builders; a major mixed-use real estate development corporation; an educational sustainability non-profit; and global corporations. Read more here.

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About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Planning / Land Use category from March 2008.

Planning / Land Use: February 2008 is the previous archive.

Planning / Land Use: April 2008 is the next archive.

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